Museum of Feelings and New York City Engage with Rainbow Broadband

Does a “mood ring for New York City,” outfitted with a unique exterior that reacts to social media and real time data to reflect the city’s emotions sound intriguing? Then join the crowds gathering daily at The Museum of Feelings.

Presented by Glade and created by creative firm RadicalMedia, this engaging temporary exhibit is at Brookfield Place in Lower Manhattan’s Battery Park City – fun to visit, but a challenging location to establish a strong Internet connection.

That’s where Rainbow Broadband’s carrier class fixed wireless network comes in: It’s made specifically for the unique demands of NYC events, buildings and businesses. Rainbow Broadband used their network know-how to supply WIFI via a fast 20 Mbps symmetrical connection to the museum, which opened to the public November 24th and will run through December 15th.  

In addition to supporting the high-speed bandwidth needed to deliver real time information to the exhibit’s installations, Rainbow Broadband’s connection ensures attendees can easily share pictures, video and social media updates to the outside world throughout their visit.

“When RadicalMedia is planning for experiential installations, one certainty is that I can rely on Rainbow Broadband,” says Marc Frydman, Director of IT at RadicalMedia. “Their team always provides me with a smart, thorough and prompt solution. We depend on them to make fast Internet work seamlessly, even at logistically challenging situations like The Museum of Feelings.”

In 10+ years of proven expertise supplying New York City events with customized connectivity solutions, Rainbow Broadband has supported international brands including Google, Microsoft, HP, Samsung, Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week, The Global Citizen Festival, and many more.

Rainbow Broadband frequently creates networks that support thousands of people in 48 hours or less. Rainbow Broadband can customize services to each event’s unique specifications, providing multiple WIFI networks and passwords, separate VLANs, and hard lines with specific bandwidth profiles for live streaming.

Read more on this topic at Wired.com